Archive for the ‘safety’ Category

BREAKING NEWS: Crane Drops Load At World Trade Center Construction Site, Injuring Construction Worker, says CBS NY

Thursday, February 16th, 2012

BREAKING NEWS: Crane Drops Load At World Trade Center Construction Site, Injuring Construction Worker, reports CBS New York.

And as a result of this incident, NYCT is reporting that the 1 train is suspended between Chambers St and South Ferry.

mta.info service alert for suspended (1)

Edit: as per NotifyNYC – Notification issued 2/16/12 at 11:10 AM. 1 train service has been restored between Chambers Street and South Ferry (MN). Expect residual delays and continued emergency service activity near the World Trade Center.

Photo of damaged rails from the devastating earthquake in New Zealand

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011

This is an interesting photo of the effects of the devastating earthquake that struck New Zealand.

A rail line buckled by the shifting earth is pictured in Christchurch

Dancer hit by Amtrak train when CN crossing lights and gates fail

Wednesday, April 21st, 2010

Katie Lunn

From: CN warning system failed in fatal crossing collision

With no safety gates or lights to warn her, Katie Lunn had no chance as a speeding Amtrak train approached her SUV Friday.

The young Naperville dance teacher died after the train rammed into her vehicle as she headed home after a performance at Governor’s State University.

The Canadian National Railway confirmed Monday that the warning system was not functioning properly at the Stuenkel Road crossing in University Park when the accident occurred. A CN crew had been working at the crossing that day, but officials would not comment on reports they had deactivated the warning system and not turned it back on.

Source: Transportation Communications Newsletter

Dog run over by train – twice – and lived

Monday, April 12th, 2010

The dog lived. Happy ending.

The engineer drove back in his car and rescued the dog.

Graffiti vandal loses leg in subway tunnel

Monday, February 15th, 2010

These people do not belong in subway tunnels, and they should not be vandalizing public property. Let what happened to this kid be a lesson to others like him.

Boy’s Leg Is Severed in Tunnel on N Line

NYCT releases photos of 181 Street station work on official service changes twitter account

Wednesday, August 19th, 2009

Photo of 181 St station on Twitpic

The shock here is not that NYCT uses twitter – they’ve been using it for a long time – but rather that they are actually releasing photos of the interior of the station, from right after the ceiling collapse to current views of the repair efforts. Check these out before someone at NYCT or the MTA catches wind of this and makes the photos disappear!

Link: http://twitpic.com/photos/NYCTSubwayScoop

Work progressing to build protective shield over platform and... on Twitpic

Source: SubChat

181 Street Subway Station Collapse – Stupid Person-on-the-Street Comment of the Day

Tuesday, August 18th, 2009

Today’s Metro newspaper features a short(!) article on the subway ceiling collapse at the 181st Street subway station on the (1) line. As usual, the reporter asked some subway rider member of the public to offer an opinion. The genius she chose made this enlightening remark:

“[The 181st Street Station is] old,” said Luz Contreras, 46. “The station at 191st looks old, too. I’m worried if something happens here, it could happen at the other one next.” (emphasis added)

Is that so? No, Luz. The station at 191st Street was COMPLETELY REFURBISHED in 2003-2004. And it looks fantastic. Maybe the nice white tiles and walls have gotten dirty since the renovation, but dirty does not equal old!

Take a look at some photos. In each row, the photo on the left is from before the renovation, and the photo on the right is from after the renovation.

Those last two are the most clear example.

Here are some bonus photos from after the renovation:

Now if you want to complain about something, how about complaining about NYCT’s deplorable operational response to this incident? That’s my next blog post :)

Funky Schist Going Down in the City (Along the (1) Train Route)

Monday, August 17th, 2009

Last night, apparently part of the ceiling collapsed at the 181 St station on the (1) New York City Subway line, causing debris to fall onto the tracks. This is causing all manner of mad craziness this morning. I took the Bx10 to the Bx7 to the (A).

181 St Ceiling Collapse big - MTA Service Alert

Bad news for residents of Van Cortlandt Park, Riverdale, Spuyten Duyvil, Kingsbridge, Inwood, and Washington Heights, though the latter two have the (A) train to make up for it.

My Bx10 driver correctly announced several times that there was no (1) service, and to take the Bx7 or Bx20 to 207 St for the (A) train. However, the driver of the Bx7 I transferred to did not make any such announcement, and thus a lot of people exited his bus at 231 St to walk down to the (1) station :(

Then in my station in midtown, I heard the much lauded “Dedicated Announcer” announce that there was shuttle bus service between 242 St and 168 St (making all stops), and that all (1) trains running between 242 St and Dyckman St would be running express. Express????

SEPTA finally admits that photography is not prohibited or illegal

Tuesday, July 7th, 2009

I’m not sure when the following webpage went live, but it seems it was at least during or before March 2009. But no matter, SEPTA now has a webpage that clearly states that photography was not and still is not prohibited. Furthermore, this SEPTA Photography Guidelines webpage makes clear that amateur photography is not restricted in any way in terms of needing a permit or needing to call ahead.

From the webpage:

SEPTA welcomes photographers and artists. In return, we simply request they use common sense and courtesy to others in pursuit of their pictures. [Editor: I really don't see SEPTA (employees and police) "welcoming" photographers. What a load of bull.]

While photography is permitted in clearly defined public areas of the SEPTA system, it obviously cannot be permitted in any manner that would interfere with the safe movement of people or operation of vehicles.

Photography is obviously prohibited in any area of the SEPTA system that is not accessible to the general public. [Editor: This is a pretty funny thing for them to say, considering that photography has OBVIOUSLY been legal this whole time, while up to now many photographers have been harassed and told otherwise by the police and employees.]

While the law permits photography of private citizens in public places, common courtesy would have photographers request permission of people before taking their pictures, especially close-ups. [Editor: This was a nice touch, since so many people are misinformed on this topic.]

Worldwide terrorist attacks against public transportation facilities in recent years has required a tightening of security procedures at all SEPTA facilities. Security experts consider photographing and sketching public transportation facilities as possible pre-indicators of terrorist activity. [Editor: UH, which security experts? Because plenty know that openly taking photographs with a large, visible camera is likely the LAST thing a terrorist would do.]

While this unfortunate reality has not resulted in a prohibition of photography, SEPTA Transit Police and other law enforcement are under orders to question anyone taking photographs or sketching transit facilities. [Editor: Here's where they confirm that photography never was illegal.]

But as always, remain alert and stay safe when you’re out there photographing. It’s unlikely that the SEPTA police and employees who have been mistaken this whole time about the legality of photography are going to suddenly wake up and realize their error. Many probably know they are wrong and don’t care. They feel threatened by photography so they lie and harass instead of doing their jobs.

The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3 is the REAL DEAL

Sunday, June 7th, 2009

The New York Post published an article today that tells how much of the new movie “The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3″ was filmed in real New York City subway tunnels, in real New York City subway stations, and on real New York City subway cars, and that’s what the director demanded. I’m glad he decided ot do the right thing!

And what makes the movie unique is that the production took great pains to make this New York story as authentically New York as possible, including traipsing through dusty subway tunnels, trying to film in crowded Grand Central and risking death from the ever-humming third rail.

…..

Much of the action takes place down in the dark, rat-infested tunnels beneath the city streets, and when director Tony Scott signed on for the project, he had one demand: that as much as possible, it would be shot in the actual subway system.

“When Tony and I were prepping the picture, what we always spoke about was that we needed authenticity,” says producer Todd Black. “We didn’t want people going, ‘This isn’t New York. That’s not the real subway. That’s a set. That’s Montreal or Vancouver.’ It needed to have that whole New York flavor, on the streets and in the subway.”

That meant heading underground for what Katherine Oliver, commissioner of the Mayor’s Office of Film, Theatre and Broadcasting, says is “probably one of the biggest productions shot in the subway.”

Most of the subway scenes were filmed on a stretch of abandoned track off Brooklyn’s Hoyt-Schermerhorn station, along which the HH shuttle used to run. (Service was discontinued in 1946.) Those particular tracks were unused, but the location gave the filmmaker’s the advantage of having active A, C and G trains passing along the neighboring tracks, giving scenes a realistic feel.

[Railfanwindow.com Blog Editor's note: This would be the abandoned "side" platforms at Hoyt-Schermerhorn station, as well as the tunnel between that station and the former Court Street station, which is now the New York Transit Museum.]

“In the past, we’ve allowed filming on a platform or inside a train, but very little filming with actors down on the track,” says Joe Grodzinsky, superintendent of Rapid Transit Operations. “‘Pelham’ shot scenes with the actors on the track as trains moved past them. That was unique.”

To make sure no accidents happened, everyone involved with the production (some 400 people, including a high-up executive at Sony) was forced to enroll in an eight-hour NYC Transit safety course. The group took a classroom lesson at the NYC Transit Learning Center in Gravesend, then strapped on regulation boots and safety vests, grabbed flashlights and headed down onto the tracks from a Brooklyn R station.

Because there’s only so much space in an actual subway car — as anyone who’s been smashed up against a weird, sweaty guy during rush hour can attest — the production built a fake car on a stage at Kaufman Astoria Studios. It was made from scratch using pieces of decommissioned subway cars and powered by hydraulics, so it could zip along a 40-foot section of track.

In truth, much more of the film would have had to been shot on sound stages had NYC Transit not consented to allow the crew access to the subway. The agency has turned down requests before for many reasons, including when a plot is considered too sensitive because it involves destruction or terrorism.

“There was concern [about "Pelham"], but we were very careful to say in the film, this isn’t about terrorism,” Black says. “Particularly after 9/11, we didn’t want to make anything about this movie be about terrorism. And the original wasn’t about terrorism. It was about greed and money.”

astoria_kaufman_studios

movie_enlarge

movie_enlarge2

Image Credits: The New York Post article

Source: SubChat