Posts Tagged ‘new york’

Ride the subway to the Yankees World Series Champions Ticker Tape Parade

Thursday, November 5th, 2009

MTA New York City Transit has provided some good advice on how to best travel to the ticker tape parade celebrating the New York Yankees victory over the Philadelphia Phillies in the 2009 baseball World Series:

Although the Lexington Avenue line serves the Brooklyn Bridge-City Hall, Fulton Street-Broadway/Nassau, Wall Street, and Bowling Green stations, Yankees’ fans should be aware that the 4 5 6 lines are usually crowded during normal weekday rush hour along the corridor.

Instead, fans are encouraged to use the 1 line or the R or W lines to Rector Street, or the E to World Trade Center. Fans should also consider taking the 2 or 3 lines to Chambers Street or Wall Street, and the J to the Broad Street station.

Crowding conditions at the City Hall R and W station, Park Place 2 and 3 station and nearby 4 5 6 Brooklyn Bridge-City Hall station may force trains to bypass those stations during the parade and ceremony at City Hall. All lines affected will be monitored by supervision to ensure smooth operation.

Read the entire press release for this November 6, 2009 event, here. I’ve also provided an image of the Special Event poster for the parade, as well as an image of the revised World Series poster from earlier in the week:

MTA NYC Transit - Service Advisories - Yankees 2009 Ticker Tape Parade

MTA NYC Transit - Service Advisories - games 6 and 7 of world series poster

In addition, both Metro-North and the Long Island Rail Road will be running extra trains to bring fans to and from the parade. Click the preceding links for the train schedules.

New Street Entrance To NJ Transit Concourse Opens At New York Penn Station

Tuesday, September 1st, 2009

31st

NJ Transit finally opened yesterday its new entrance to Penn Station.

Summary info from the website:

The new entrance is located at the corner of 7th Avenue and West 31st Street at street level and is adjacent to the NJ TRANSIT Customer Service Office inside the station.

The new entrance will provide customers with direct access to and from our 7th Avenue Concourse for the first time.

The new entrance is fully accessible with ADA-compliant elevators, as well as escalators and stairs that connect the NJ TRANSIT concourse with the street at 7th Avenue.

The 31st Street entrance also includes lighting, signage and electronic train information displays for customer convenience.

I’ll have to go check it out soon. In the meantime, here’s an interior photo from NJT’s website, and some exterior photos I took back in July:

nn_fyi_3

181 Street Subway Station Collapse – Stupid Person-on-the-Street Comment of the Day

Tuesday, August 18th, 2009

Today’s Metro newspaper features a short(!) article on the subway ceiling collapse at the 181st Street subway station on the (1) line. As usual, the reporter asked some subway rider member of the public to offer an opinion. The genius she chose made this enlightening remark:

“[The 181st Street Station is] old,” said Luz Contreras, 46. “The station at 191st looks old, too. I’m worried if something happens here, it could happen at the other one next.” (emphasis added)

Is that so? No, Luz. The station at 191st Street was COMPLETELY REFURBISHED in 2003-2004. And it looks fantastic. Maybe the nice white tiles and walls have gotten dirty since the renovation, but dirty does not equal old!

Take a look at some photos. In each row, the photo on the left is from before the renovation, and the photo on the right is from after the renovation.

Those last two are the most clear example.

Here are some bonus photos from after the renovation:

Now if you want to complain about something, how about complaining about NYCT’s deplorable operational response to this incident? That’s my next blog post 🙂

Funky Schist Going Down in the City (Along the (1) Train Route)

Monday, August 17th, 2009

Last night, apparently part of the ceiling collapsed at the 181 St station on the (1) New York City Subway line, causing debris to fall onto the tracks. This is causing all manner of mad craziness this morning. I took the Bx10 to the Bx7 to the (A).

181 St Ceiling Collapse big - MTA Service Alert

Bad news for residents of Van Cortlandt Park, Riverdale, Spuyten Duyvil, Kingsbridge, Inwood, and Washington Heights, though the latter two have the (A) train to make up for it.

My Bx10 driver correctly announced several times that there was no (1) service, and to take the Bx7 or Bx20 to 207 St for the (A) train. However, the driver of the Bx7 I transferred to did not make any such announcement, and thus a lot of people exited his bus at 231 St to walk down to the (1) station 🙁

Then in my station in midtown, I heard the much lauded “Dedicated Announcer” announce that there was shuttle bus service between 242 St and 168 St (making all stops), and that all (1) trains running between 242 St and Dyckman St would be running express. Express????

Metro-North brochure for Meadowlands Rail Service

Tuesday, August 11th, 2009

TakeTrainFootBall_web

Metro-North Railroad has created a new brochure to explain their part of the direct service that they are planning to run with New Jersey Transit this fall. It is admittedly a complicated task to convey all of the options and nuances that they are trying to get across, but I think they did an okay job. The brochure is linked from a new web page Metro-North put up for this service. You can also download the PDF directly from this link: http://www.mta.info/mnr/html/SchedPDF_vWEB_Brochure.pdf

Edit: This brochure, in all its glossy printed glory, is available in the information boxes next to each of the upper level tracks at Grand Central Terminal, as of yesterday, August 19, 2009.

Penn Station receives escalator delivery

Thursday, July 9th, 2009
new escalator goes here

new escalator goes here

Walking past the construction site Monday, I saw that a door was open, allowing me to see and photograph (with cell phone camera) the empty space where a staircase once was, and where an additional escalator will hopefully soon be.

Then, that evening, I saw an escalator being delivered to Penn Station. As you can see in the photo above, not only is the old staircase gone, but the old escalator is gone too. So I’m not sure if this delivery is of a new escalator, or maybe of the old, but possibly refurbished, escalator. In any event, hopefully this moves the project along. I’m getting tired of wincing every time I see people struggling to carry large suitcases down the stairs (when there are clear signs pointing to other entrances with escalators).

escalator delivery - 30 minutes or it's free

escalator delivery - 30 minutes or it's free

New York City Subway G Line Extension Date – July 5 – Is Almost Here

Thursday, June 25th, 2009
Service Advisory at MTA.info

Service Advisory at MTA.info

July 5, 2009, is the day that the New York City subway G line will be extended to the Church Avenue station on the F line. This is necessary due to the rehabilitation of the Culver Viaduct:

Beginning July 5 and lasting approximately four years, extensive reconstruction of the Culver Viaduct will require the extension of the G Line subway service to Church Avenue in Southern Brooklyn. While designed to accommodate this major structure rehabilitation, the extension will provide additional service south of Smith-9th Street, save travel time for many customers and provide additional transfer options.

This change is necessary because rehabilitation of the steel and concrete structure, opened in 1933 as part of the IND system, requires the removal of two tracks from service for the duration of the project, eliminating the area at 4th Av-9th Street used by G trains to reverse direction.

Help build the Tel Aviv subway system while relaxing on the beach

Friday, June 19th, 2009

tel-aviv-100This Sunday, attend the Tel Aviv Beach Party in Central Park (in celebration of the city of Tel Aviv in Israel turning 100 years old), and while you’re there, tell them to build that long awaited subway already!!! If it’s not done by the time of my next visit, I’ll just have to ask for a tour of the only existing subway station in Tel Aviv – under Shalom Meir Tower.

Planned Tel Aviv Subway Map

Those darn interns and their funny MTA SERVICE ALERT mistakes

Friday, June 19th, 2009
mta-service-alert-b-d-f-web

maximum LOLs to be had

This NYCT SERVICE ALERT appeared at mta.info Tuesday morning. Upon seeing it, I says to myself, I says: “Have trolley tracks been relaid in the Bronx and have the (B), (D), and (F) trains been diverted to run along them?!?!?”

In case you’re not getting the joke, look at the last paragraph.

The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3 is the REAL DEAL

Sunday, June 7th, 2009

The New York Post published an article today that tells how much of the new movie “The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3” was filmed in real New York City subway tunnels, in real New York City subway stations, and on real New York City subway cars, and that’s what the director demanded. I’m glad he decided ot do the right thing!

And what makes the movie unique is that the production took great pains to make this New York story as authentically New York as possible, including traipsing through dusty subway tunnels, trying to film in crowded Grand Central and risking death from the ever-humming third rail.

…..

Much of the action takes place down in the dark, rat-infested tunnels beneath the city streets, and when director Tony Scott signed on for the project, he had one demand: that as much as possible, it would be shot in the actual subway system.

“When Tony and I were prepping the picture, what we always spoke about was that we needed authenticity,” says producer Todd Black. “We didn’t want people going, ‘This isn’t New York. That’s not the real subway. That’s a set. That’s Montreal or Vancouver.’ It needed to have that whole New York flavor, on the streets and in the subway.”

That meant heading underground for what Katherine Oliver, commissioner of the Mayor’s Office of Film, Theatre and Broadcasting, says is “probably one of the biggest productions shot in the subway.”

Most of the subway scenes were filmed on a stretch of abandoned track off Brooklyn’s Hoyt-Schermerhorn station, along which the HH shuttle used to run. (Service was discontinued in 1946.) Those particular tracks were unused, but the location gave the filmmaker’s the advantage of having active A, C and G trains passing along the neighboring tracks, giving scenes a realistic feel.

[Railfanwindow.com Blog Editor’s note: This would be the abandoned “side” platforms at Hoyt-Schermerhorn station, as well as the tunnel between that station and the former Court Street station, which is now the New York Transit Museum.]

“In the past, we’ve allowed filming on a platform or inside a train, but very little filming with actors down on the track,” says Joe Grodzinsky, superintendent of Rapid Transit Operations. “‘Pelham’ shot scenes with the actors on the track as trains moved past them. That was unique.”

To make sure no accidents happened, everyone involved with the production (some 400 people, including a high-up executive at Sony) was forced to enroll in an eight-hour NYC Transit safety course. The group took a classroom lesson at the NYC Transit Learning Center in Gravesend, then strapped on regulation boots and safety vests, grabbed flashlights and headed down onto the tracks from a Brooklyn R station.

Because there’s only so much space in an actual subway car — as anyone who’s been smashed up against a weird, sweaty guy during rush hour can attest — the production built a fake car on a stage at Kaufman Astoria Studios. It was made from scratch using pieces of decommissioned subway cars and powered by hydraulics, so it could zip along a 40-foot section of track.

In truth, much more of the film would have had to been shot on sound stages had NYC Transit not consented to allow the crew access to the subway. The agency has turned down requests before for many reasons, including when a plot is considered too sensitive because it involves destruction or terrorism.

“There was concern [about “Pelham”], but we were very careful to say in the film, this isn’t about terrorism,” Black says. “Particularly after 9/11, we didn’t want to make anything about this movie be about terrorism. And the original wasn’t about terrorism. It was about greed and money.”

astoria_kaufman_studios

movie_enlarge

movie_enlarge2

Image Credits: The New York Post article

Source: SubChat