Posts Tagged ‘train’

Meadowlands Rail Station Inaugural Train Ride and Opening Ceremony

Monday, July 20th, 2009

inaugural-ride

NJ Transit, the New Jersey Sports & Exposition Authority, and the Port Authority of NY & NJ hosted an inaugural ride to the opening ceremony of the new Meadowlands Rail Station today. The inaugural train departed Hoboken at 1:25 PM, then departed Secaucus a few minutes late at about 1:45 PM, and arrived at the new Meadowlands station at 2:00 PM. Below are many of the photos I took during the day. Click on the thumbnail image to view the full size photograph.

Governor Jon S. Corzine, New York Jets owner Woody Johnson, and New York Giants co-owner John Mara rode the train from Secaucus (as far as I can tell, because I didn’t see them board at Hoboken) and then spoke at the opening ceremony after. Various other politicians and officials were also present.

After the speeches, Governor Corzine cut the ribbon, symbolically opening the station for service.

The station itself is basic but nice.

Some people would like to see the line loop around the sports complex, but for now it unceremoniously dead ends.

At 3:00 PM, the inaugural train returned to Secaucus and Hoboken.

Revenue service to the Meadowlands Rail Station begins this Sunday for the CONCACAF Gold Cup Final match at 3:00 PM at Giants Stadium. The first train leaves Hoboken at 11:30 AM.

Official NJ Transit press release about today’s events: GOVERNOR CORZINE LAUNCHES RAIL SERVICE TO THE MEADOWLANDS

Meadowlands Rail Station Ribbon Cutting Today

Monday, July 20th, 2009

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A ribbon cutting ceremony and inaugural train ride to the new NJ Transit Meadowlands Rail Station is taking place today.

Temporary timetables for the G line crosstown subway service

Friday, July 17th, 2009

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Temporary schedules/timetables have been posted to the MTA/NYCT website for the G subway line. These temporary timetables are in effect throughout July and August 2009 due to “extensive system maintenance.”

Temporary schedules for the G line

Temporary schedules for the G line

42 Street Subway Shuttle Wrap for Dark Blue on TNT

Sunday, July 5th, 2009

The latest advertising wrap on the outside of the subway cars that run on the 42nd Street Shuttle between Times Square and Grand Central is for the new TNT television series called Dark Blue. Here are some photos I took at Times Square:


NYCT finally posts the Service Changes poster for the G line extension

Thursday, July 2nd, 2009

As announced here on the Railfan Window Blog first, the G line extension to Church Avenue is still scheduled to begin on-time on July 5, 2009.

Here is the Service Changes poster than New York City Transit finally uploaded to their website.

Service Changes: G Line Extension to Church Av beginning July 5, 2009

Service Changes: G Line Extension to Church Av beginning July 5, 2009

New York City Subway G Line Extension Date – July 5 – Is Almost Here

Thursday, June 25th, 2009
Service Advisory at MTA.info

Service Advisory at MTA.info

July 5, 2009, is the day that the New York City subway G line will be extended to the Church Avenue station on the F line. This is necessary due to the rehabilitation of the Culver Viaduct:

Beginning July 5 and lasting approximately four years, extensive reconstruction of the Culver Viaduct will require the extension of the G Line subway service to Church Avenue in Southern Brooklyn. While designed to accommodate this major structure rehabilitation, the extension will provide additional service south of Smith-9th Street, save travel time for many customers and provide additional transfer options.

This change is necessary because rehabilitation of the steel and concrete structure, opened in 1933 as part of the IND system, requires the removal of two tracks from service for the duration of the project, eliminating the area at 4th Av-9th Street used by G trains to reverse direction.

Those darn interns and their funny MTA SERVICE ALERT mistakes

Friday, June 19th, 2009
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maximum LOLs to be had

This NYCT SERVICE ALERT appeared at mta.info Tuesday morning. Upon seeing it, I says to myself, I says: “Have trolley tracks been relaid in the Bronx and have the (B), (D), and (F) trains been diverted to run along them?!?!?”

In case you’re not getting the joke, look at the last paragraph.

Initial Ridership Figures for Yankee Stadium Metro-North Station

Monday, June 15th, 2009

Take the train_web

Weekdays: about 50 vs. projection of 400

Game days: high of 4,200 vs. capacity of 10,000

Source: Slow start at new station

Final day of service for the R-40 “Slant” subway cars

Friday, June 12th, 2009

Rumor has it that today *may* be the final day of service for these awesome subway cars. In fact, the R-40 Slants have always been my favorite New York City subway cars, based on their amazing modern design, penned by Raymond Loewy in the 1960’s. Over the years their appearance has been marred (see the images in the middle of the page) by the addition of safety equipment and General Overhaul (GOH). Still, their unique railfan window (tall and narrow) allowed countless hundreds of thousands of young children to see out the front of the subway train (the railfan windows of the other subway cars were situated too high for them to see out of).

Goodbye old friends.

The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3 is the REAL DEAL

Sunday, June 7th, 2009

The New York Post published an article today that tells how much of the new movie “The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3” was filmed in real New York City subway tunnels, in real New York City subway stations, and on real New York City subway cars, and that’s what the director demanded. I’m glad he decided ot do the right thing!

And what makes the movie unique is that the production took great pains to make this New York story as authentically New York as possible, including traipsing through dusty subway tunnels, trying to film in crowded Grand Central and risking death from the ever-humming third rail.

…..

Much of the action takes place down in the dark, rat-infested tunnels beneath the city streets, and when director Tony Scott signed on for the project, he had one demand: that as much as possible, it would be shot in the actual subway system.

“When Tony and I were prepping the picture, what we always spoke about was that we needed authenticity,” says producer Todd Black. “We didn’t want people going, ‘This isn’t New York. That’s not the real subway. That’s a set. That’s Montreal or Vancouver.’ It needed to have that whole New York flavor, on the streets and in the subway.”

That meant heading underground for what Katherine Oliver, commissioner of the Mayor’s Office of Film, Theatre and Broadcasting, says is “probably one of the biggest productions shot in the subway.”

Most of the subway scenes were filmed on a stretch of abandoned track off Brooklyn’s Hoyt-Schermerhorn station, along which the HH shuttle used to run. (Service was discontinued in 1946.) Those particular tracks were unused, but the location gave the filmmaker’s the advantage of having active A, C and G trains passing along the neighboring tracks, giving scenes a realistic feel.

[Railfanwindow.com Blog Editor’s note: This would be the abandoned “side” platforms at Hoyt-Schermerhorn station, as well as the tunnel between that station and the former Court Street station, which is now the New York Transit Museum.]

“In the past, we’ve allowed filming on a platform or inside a train, but very little filming with actors down on the track,” says Joe Grodzinsky, superintendent of Rapid Transit Operations. “‘Pelham’ shot scenes with the actors on the track as trains moved past them. That was unique.”

To make sure no accidents happened, everyone involved with the production (some 400 people, including a high-up executive at Sony) was forced to enroll in an eight-hour NYC Transit safety course. The group took a classroom lesson at the NYC Transit Learning Center in Gravesend, then strapped on regulation boots and safety vests, grabbed flashlights and headed down onto the tracks from a Brooklyn R station.

Because there’s only so much space in an actual subway car — as anyone who’s been smashed up against a weird, sweaty guy during rush hour can attest — the production built a fake car on a stage at Kaufman Astoria Studios. It was made from scratch using pieces of decommissioned subway cars and powered by hydraulics, so it could zip along a 40-foot section of track.

In truth, much more of the film would have had to been shot on sound stages had NYC Transit not consented to allow the crew access to the subway. The agency has turned down requests before for many reasons, including when a plot is considered too sensitive because it involves destruction or terrorism.

“There was concern [about “Pelham”], but we were very careful to say in the film, this isn’t about terrorism,” Black says. “Particularly after 9/11, we didn’t want to make anything about this movie be about terrorism. And the original wasn’t about terrorism. It was about greed and money.”

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Image Credits: The New York Post article

Source: SubChat